Info

All About Breastfeeding

Lori Jill Isenstadt from All About Breastfeeding is on a mission to normalize breastfeeding..... all around the world. Learn from mothers who are actively breastfeeding, sharing their personal stories of breastfeeding with ease and babies who just know exactly what to do. Hear intimate stories from mothers about their struggles and pain with breastfeeding. Everyday moms sharing extraordinary stories of what life was like behind their breastfeeding doors. Get help with common concerns such as low milk supply, oversupply, babies who are tongue and lip tied, premature babies, sick babies who are breastfeeding as well as babies who have had surgeries such as heart and cleft surgeries. Book authors and physicians who are huge breastfeeding supporters share their expertise as they all have a common interest. To normalize breastfeeding. Stories about mothering, parenting, pregnancy and postpartum are shared too.
RSS Feed Subscribe in Apple Podcasts
All About Breastfeeding
2022
January


2021
December
November
October
August
July
June
May
April
March
January


2020
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2019
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2015
December
November
October


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: January, 2018
Jan 29, 2018

Talia was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Her mother was a teacher. Her father was in medical school. They then moved to Chicago for his residency. Her Dad worked long hours and did not see him much. She has very good memories of her childhood. They soon headed back to Tuscon and stayed there through her high school years and went to the University of Arizona. She then headed to Phoenix to attend school to become a PA. She loves Phoenix and plans on staying here for a long time.

www.allaboutbreastfeeding.biz/podcast

Jan 27, 2018
First topics I want to cover is - The Scales -My general rule of thumb when it comes to this topic is:   Don't take the scales and the numbers too seriously, without weighing other important factors.
 
Their are 2 main reasons for this advise:
 
  1.  What scale is used can vary - first weight check, peds visit, visit with me
  2. What your baby is weighed in can vary -naked at birth, different diapers, cloth/disposable, outfit, onsie, hats, mittens socks
  3. disposable diaper is about half ounce.  cloth with wrap can be 4-6 oz.  short sleeve onsie - 3 oz,  long sleeve onsie with socks can be 7 oz
Jan 22, 2018

Talia is a mom to 2 tiny humans (Stella 2 ½ and Henry 3 months), a wife, a Physician Assistant and lover of all things outdoors. She’s been practicing in Women’s Health for over 10 years, but now considers herself a bit of a ‘Renegade PA,’ as she’s stepped outside of conventional medical practice and into the world of holistic and functional medicine.  Talia has a Masters of Medical Science and describes herself as someone who is a self taught student of anything that floats her boat.

Jan 19, 2018
Engorgement is the swelling or congestion of body tissues.
When we are referring to breast engorgement, we are describing the painful swelling that occurs when the breasts become  very full and very firm.  Sometimes the breasts are actually hard and all these sensations lead to very painful breasts.  They can feel very heavy, sometimes throbbing, you noticed your skin is quite stretched and sometimes this fullness and firmness leads to your armpits.  Engorgement can affect one or both breasts. 
Jan 15, 2018
There are actually quite a few reasons why you can struggle with early breastfeeding.  Here are some possible scenarios that you might find yourself dealing with a baby who is not breastfeeding well:
 
  1.  Probably the most common reason for a hard start is a premature birth.  When babies are born early it can make it more difficult for them to breastfeed.
  2. The reasons can be numerous so it is not helpful at this point to conjecture.  What we really want to do is say.. okay, this is the situation, now what do we do about it.
Jan 12, 2018
  1.  Your baby should have been gradually gaining back any weight loss from the first 4 days, until they were back to birthweight at 2 weeks old.
  2. Breastfeeding should not be painful for you.
  3. Your baby comes to the breast and feedings are comfortable for you.  You should not be experiencing any breast pain or nipple pain.
  1. When your baby is breastfeeding he should be relaxing at breast, focused on feeding, staying put and not coming on and off, multiple times during the feeding.
Your baby should be feeding about 8 times a day.  Perhaps it is 7 or perhaps it is 9 somewhere in there would be normal.
 
Jan 8, 2018

Your baby is now 4-5 days old.  You are just beginning to get the hang of breastfeeding. Sure you might feel awkward with it all, however, you are now getting use to a baby feeding at your breast 8 times a day. You are continuing to experiment with different positions to find which ones seem to work best for you and your baby.  In some places you will find you need to use a pillow and a stool. Other places where you breastfeed, your set up will be different

 

Read More

Jan 5, 2018
The first 24 hours:
 
If all went well with your birth and you and your baby do not need any special care, it is best if you do what you can to spend the first 24 hours just being with your baby.  We like to call it your "babymoon" time.  Your physical body and emotional mind has been through a lot of changes from pregnancy to birth to postpartum.  You have gone through a lot in the last 9 months.  Here is what you can expect the first 24 hours:
 
Read More 
Jan 1, 2018

As a lactation consultant, I have long since recognized the lack of information mothers have about breastfeeding. Not only about early breastfeeding difficulties, but also how this impacts their postpartum lifestyle. Breastfeeding comes fairly easy for some mothers and I want them to know that it may not come easy for your sister or best friend. I want you to know that you can be of great help to them.  You can provide emotional support, practical help and suggest they seek professional help.  For some mothers, early breastfeeding is more challenging than they thought it would be. It is very emotional and exhausting for some mothers.  When this happens, we tend to become very overwhelmed, isolate ourselves and some mothers become depressed.

1